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Parents Are Spending Thousands On YouTube Camps That Teach Kids How To Be Famous

Various YouTube summer camps have begun launching across the nation, designed to turn regular elementary and middle-school-aged children into bonfire internet sensations. Per a recent report from the Wall Street Journal, parents are spending nearly $1,000 dollars a week for their children to learn how to create branded social media-related content. Though YouTube is not affiliated with or in any communication with any summer program, such camps are on the rise, and parents with means have made them a thing.

One summer camp gaining traction is YouTube STAR Creator Studio. Located in Culver City, California, its website states that it “branches out from traditional storytelling to how to create the fun and hilarious content that kids love to watch.” The camp is designed for those in first through sixth grade, according to the website, and charges $375 dollars a week. Another prominent company is Level Up, which, according to the organization, became the first company in North America to offer YouTube classes and camps when it opened five years ago. Level Up takes an educational approach toward the platform to attract kids who “want to learn how to create an awesome YouTube channel,” and promises that the class will give students the “skills to create engaging videos.” The topics covered in Level Up’s the summer camp range from learning how to interview people, draft storyboard ideas, and source and sync audio files.

Despite the rise in programs, many parents interviewed in the Wall Street Journal dismissed the idea of being a “YouTube star,” believing it as nothing more than a hobby for their young children. [Camp director] disagrees, believing that being a YouTuber is a viable career path for the next generation.

“YouTube is now not only the preferred source of entertainment for kids, but it is also now their preferred career choice.”

YouTube’s Top-Earner For 2018 Is a 7-Year-Old

In 2018 the most-downloaded iPhone app was YouTube, reports USA Today, while Amazon’s best-selling item was their Fire TV Stick for streaming video. The No. 1 earner on YouTube this year is 7-year-old Ryan. For all those unboxing videos and playing with toys — and his own new line of toys at Walmart — he and his family will pull in a cool $22 million, according to Forbes. Ryan launched the channel in 2015 — when he was four — and now has 17.3 million followers.